Free Energy by William H. Bradshaw, Dipl. T., CPIM
Author of Secrets of the Pink Kush



The Concept
The basic concept use solar panels to transform the energy of the Sun into electrical energy and then to use that energy to split water molecules into their two separate atoms and then collect the two into two different storage tanks. You employ a Hofmann voltameter (or Hoffman Apparatus with different spellings) to split the hydrogen and oxygen from water. This is achieved through the use of electricity generated by the solar panels. The Hoffman Apparatus will create hydrogen and oxygen at each of the respective electrodes. The anode creates oxygen and the cathode creates hydrogen. The oxygen can be vented out directly into the atmosphere or captured into one holding tank while the hydrogen is then run into a separate holding tank.



The hydrogen holding tank is then used to dispense smaller amounts into portable tanks that can be used as a feed for any hydrogen based system of electricity or mechanical energy. The hydrogen is kept in a small on-demand compressed tank to reduce safety risks.



Problems With Solar Panel/Hoffman Apparatus Approach
Horrman Apparatus: The only problem for this application would be replacement of the anode and cathode on a periodic basis.
Solar Panels: The solar panels may need to be replaced if they become damaged or worn to the point they can no longer produce electrical current. They will need to be cleaned and inspected on a periodic basis.



Hydrogen Tanks: Hydrogen is extremely dangerous so the tanks and fittings would need to be inspected and tested on a periodic basis.

Initial design and cost will be prohibitive for an individual user I suspect. They may not permit this type of operation in the general public.



Advantage With Solar Panel/Hoffman Apparatus Approach
All energy produced is totally free. The only costs are the initial setup and transportation of the tanks to destined markets. This could be employed in areas where land is cheap and sunshine is frequent.

- William H. Bradshaw